Monday, 4 March 2013

3 Poems by Cher Bibler



Regret

When the first brick fell
we could’ve picked it up and put it back,
mortared it in place.
When the second, the third, fell
there was still time. It would’ve
been a simple task.
We saw them laying there, thought
it was no big deal.
We would take a day, a couple of days,
soon, and we would fix it.
Take the time to do it right,
only we never had the time.
More bricks fell, we pretended we
didn’t see them;
we no longer knew which went where.
I am not sure where the turning point was
but all of a sudden it was too much,
we couldn’t fix it anymore.
It was too big for us.
And everyone who looked at it shook
their heads sadly, could offer no
advice, could only remember the
days when it had stood solid and
proud.
Could only regret.


(no title)

I am breathing in your love;
it catches in my lungs. I have
to take it in careful doses.
I have to watch the
density of the air.
Sometimes when I’m alone
I cough it up in big drops.
It’s like oil and water;
your love means well, but
meaning well isn’t enough.


Airport in Columbus

People drinking scotches in one of the bars
Faces in computers buried in work
talking on phones you can’t see
gesturing as if to ghosts
while you pretend you can’t hear
pretend you’re not listening
that you don’t have an insatiable interest
in other peoples’ lives
you pretend to read your book


Bionote: 

Cher Bibler is the author of one book of poetry, California, California. She has worked as editor of Amanda Blue, a poetry magazine, and co-editor of a literary magazine, the Wastelands Review. She was a fiction reader for the Mid American Review and worked as poetry editor for the Heartlands Review. She was a book reviewer for Literary Zoo. She was a founding member of the alternative band Tinfoil, as bass/rhythm guitarist, singer and songwriter. Over their career, they released 12 albums. One of their songs, People Don’t Know, will be featured in an indie film, Certainty, directed by Keith Mosher. Her short story, Not Waving But Drowning, was a winner in the annual NOBS competition, and her current novel, I am never sure when, was a finalist in this year’s (2012) Faulkner competition. Her poetry has appeared in such publications as This Side of Paradise, Blue Hour Magazine, Thirteen Myna Birds and The Evergreen ReviewShe resides in Merida, Mexico, is in the process of forming a new band, and serves as the content editor of In Other Words: Merida.

No comments:

Post a comment