Wednesday, 5 February 2014

2 Poems by Donal Mahoney

After Burying a Wife

Were she here with me now,
by the waist I would raise her,
a chalice of wonder.

I’d bellow hosannas
and whirl her around,
tell her again that I love her,

press my face moist
in the pleats of her skirt,
ask her to sprinkle

phlox on the curls
of our children
if they are with her,

ask her to stay a while longer
while I do so much more
were she here with me now.


Postpartum Depression

A wound like that
doesn't leave a scar
because it never heals.

Fifty years ago
the doctors didn't
have a name for it

but that's no help
to Jimmy now.
Ginny's dead

and their six kids
have children of their own,
some of them in college.

The doctors know
how to treat it now.
They tell mothers

what to watch for
after giving birth.
They tell fathers, too,

but that's no help
to Jimmy
in his wheel chair

sitting in the lobby
of the nursing home
watching silent

movies of his life
flicker through his mind.
A rerun every day.

He can't even
speak about it
since the stroke. 

A wound like that
doesn't leave a scar
because it never heals.


Bionote

Donal Mahoney, a native of Chicago, lives in St. Louis, Missouri. Some of his earliest work can be found here: http://booksonblog12.blogspot.com/  donalmahoney@charter.net

No comments:

Post a comment